CMC Safety Division

 

CMC Safety Division

Promoting Safety Awareness One Marine at a Time

OUR MISSION
To enhance the Marine Corps’ consistent posture of combat readiness by ensuring risk management principles are incorporated in all of our efforts in order to effect a positive behavioral and cultural change across the Marine Corps.
OUR VISION
A Marine Corps culture where risk management and force preservation principles are integral to mission execution, residing at all levels of the Corps, from the most junior Private up to the Commandant.
Safety Message

 SUMMER SAFETY

SafeTips from CMC Safety Division

(article contributions courtesy of The Red Cross)


 


 

About Heat Waves

In recent years, excessive heat has caused more deaths than all other weather events, including floods. A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessive heat, generally 10 degrees or more above average, often combined with excessive humidity.

You will likely hear weather forecasters use these terms when a heat wave is predicted in your community:

  • Excessive Heat Watch - Conditions are favorable for an excessive heat event to meet or exceed local Excessive Heat Warning criteria in the next 24 to 72 hours.

  • Heat Advisory - Heat Index values are forecasting to meet locally defined advisory criteria for 1 to 2 days (daytime highs= 100-105° Fahrenheit).

  • Excessive Heat Warning - Heat Index values are forecasting to meet or exceed locally defined warning criteria for at least 2 days (daytime highs= 105-110° Fahrenheit).

 

What To Do Before a Heat Wave 

  • Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.

  • Be aware of both the temperature and the heat index. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined.

  • Discuss heat safety precautions with members of your household. Have a plan for wherever you spend time— home, work and school—and prepare for power outages.

  • Check the contents of your emergency disaster kit in case a power outage occurs.

  • Know those in your neighborhood who are elderly, young, sick or overweight. They are more likely to become victims of excessive heat and may need help.

  • If you do not have air conditioning, choose places you could go to for relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls).

  • Be aware that people living in urban areas may be at greater risk from the effects of a prolonged heat wave than are people living in rural areas.

  • Get trained in First Aid to learn how to treat heat-related emergencies.

  • Ensure that your animals' needs for water and shade are met.

 

What To Do During a Heat Wave  

  • Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).

  • Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles.

  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.

  • Eat small meals and eat more often.

  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.

  • Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day.

  • Postpone outdoor games and activities.

  • Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.

  • Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.

  • Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.

  • Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.

 

How to Treat Heat-Related Illnesses

During heat waves people are susceptible to three heat-related conditions. Here’s how to recognize and respond to them.


+ Heat Cramps

  • Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat. Get the person to a cooler place and have him or her rest in a comfortable position. Lightly stretch the affected muscle and gently massage the area.

  • Give an electrolyte-containing fluid, such as a commercial sports drink, fruit juice or milk. Water may also be given. Do not give the person salt tablets.

 

+ Heat Exhaustion

  • Heat exhaustion is a more severe condition than heat cramps. Heat exhaustion often affects athletes, firefighters, construction workers and factory workers. It also affects those wearing heavy clothing in a hot, humid environment. Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale, ashen or flushed skin; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.

  • Move the person to a cooler environment with circulating air. Remove or loosen as much clothing as possible and apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fanning or spraying the person with water also can help. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of a cool fluid such as a commercial sports drink or fruit juice to restore fluids and electrolytes. Milk or water may also be given. Give about 4 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes.

  • If the person’s condition does not improve or if he or she refuses water, has a change in consciousness, or vomits, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.

 

+ Heat Stroke

  • Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that usually occurs by ignoring the signals of heat exhaustion. Heat stroke develops when the body systems are overwhelmed by heat and begin to stop functioning. Signs of heat stroke include extremely high body temperature, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; confusion; vomiting; and seizures.

  • Heat stroke is life-threatening. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number immediately.

  • Rapidly cool the body by immersing the person up to the neck in cold water, if possible OR douse or spray the person with cold water.

  • Sponge the person with ice water-doused towels over the entire body, frequently rotating the cold, wet towels.

  • Cover the person with bags of ice.

  • If you are not able to measure and monitor the person’s temperature, apply rapid cooling methods for 20 minutes or until the person’s condition improves.

 

 

Helpful Resources About Heat-Related Injuries:

https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/extremeheat/heat_guide.html

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/

OSHA Poster on Heat Prevention.pdf

 

 

More SafeTips from CMC SD

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

Aviation Mishap Drill
Marine Aircraft Group (MAG) 31 from Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Beaufort conducts pilot rescue drills in the Ocean around Beaufort, SC.

Contacts
Director  604-4361
Deputy Director 604-4173
Policy Branch Head (EA)            604-4367
Avaition Branch Head 604-4172
Ground Branch Head 604-4172
SOH Branch Head 604-4169
Safety Quick Links

  

 

 

 

 

NAVAL SAFETY CENTER

MarinesTV
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U.S. Army Paratroopers assigned to Bravo Company, 54th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 173rd Airborne Brigade, conduct brief airfield repair and crater repair training with the High Mobility Engineer Excavator (HMEE) near Trecenta , Rovigo, June 20, 2018.
The 173rd Airborne Brigade is the U.S. Army Contingency Response Force in Europe, capable of projecting ready forces anywhere in the U.S. European, Africa or Central Commands areas of responsibility within 18 hours.
(U.S. Army photo by Antonio Bedin)
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